Aboriginal Biographies

The names of Aboriginal people mentioned in the State Records are cross-referenced here, along with any other information available about that person. The name is linked to the original document wherein that name is mentioned.

Warning: Please be aware that this page contains images and names of Aboriginal people who are deceased, which may cause distress to some readers.

These records often include information that is racist, insensitive, invasive, and demeaning, which would be very painful to their descendent families. However, it is also important to honour every one of these people, who showed resilience and agency whilst under the greatest duress from the colonisers. Everyone named here was a person who has a story to tell, even if it just a sentence, and their story is worth telling because it acknowledges their lives. This list is a roll of honour for those who suffered under a crushing regime, yet maintained the dignity that was their human right, that was their name. We apologise to anyone who is distressed by this information and will remove any name on request from their family.

Agot, possibly from Birriliburu country; camped near Lake Nabberu in 1909, and was also known by the English name Willie. He was born about 1893 and was suffering from “consumption” (tuberculosis) in 1909

Banyie, possibly from Birriliburu country; camped near Lake Nabberu in 1909, she was born about 1855 and was blind by 1909

Barraga, possibly from Wadjarri Yamatji country, mentioned as needing clothing at Mt Phillip station in 1909

Billy, see Coongoo

Bobbie Teetum, possibly from Nyaki-Nyaki Noongar country near Doodlekin:, Bobbie owned a horse and cart at the time of his death in 1909; he had two wives: Eliza, also known as Liza, and Nellie, also known as Janie, and several children

Carrie [Ong], also know as Eva, was employed as a domestic labourer in the home of William & Catherine Cusack in Midland Junction. The Cusack’s had connections with Tambrey station, 190 kms south of Roebourne, in Ngarluma country, and Mundabullangana station, 100 kms south of Port Hedland, in Kariyarra. It is possible, therefore, that Johnny came from Ngarluma or Kariyarra country.

Cooberong, also called Winnie or Wineri, possibly from Banjima country; Cooberong was sick with venereal disease at Mulga Downs Station in 1909; at that time, Cooberong was about 35 years old and was too sick to be able to take care of herself. It is unclear if Cooberong was sent to Bernier Island lock hospital. 1909

Coongoo, also known by his English name Billy, possibly from Bardi Jawi or Nyul-Nyul country; he was aged around 60 and residing at Weedong Station, Pender Bay, in 1909; possibly previously living at Cygnet Bay Mission

Cranky Jonney, from Tharrkari country, was born about 1855 and continued to live on country after it was colonised by the British when Mangaroon Pastoral Station was established

Cuteen, possibly from Umiida, Unggarrangu, Unggumi, or Warrwa country (it is not clear because Oobagooma Station, the camp where Cuteen was found, is on the border of these countries, and also it might have been a gathering of different communities at that camp, at that time); Cuteen was taken to Derby Hospital, very ill. She discharged herself from the hospital and it is unclear if Cuteen was sent to Bernier Island lock hospital. 1909

Eliza, also known as Liza, was the wife and widow of Bobbie Teetum; after his death in 1909, his property was sold and Eliza purchased sewing materials, suggesting she was a competent needlewoman.

Hoppy Briton, possibly from Wudjari country (however, Bremer Bay was an important summer salmon fishing place for a number of different Australian language groups); born about 1850, he was crippled and unable to work at Bremer Bay in 1909

Hunter, Nelly & Jennie, from Bardi country; Nelly (born c1897) and Jennie (born c1894) were the daughters of Harry Hunter (see under European Biographies), who applied for certificates of exemption for them in 1909.

Jabidy, possibly from Wadjarri Yamatji country, mentioned as needing clothing at Mt Phillip station in 1909

Jacky Wyndham, also known as Jack or Jackie; possibly from Gija country, around Warnum; 1909

Jarra-a-Jarra, from Tharrkari country, was born about 1855 and continued to live on country after it was colonised by the British when Mangaroon Pastoral Station was established

Jemimah, from Tharrkari country, was born about 1855 and continued to live on country after it was colonised by the British when Mangaroon Pastoral Station was established

Jenny, see Toorgabur

Jimmy, see entry for Yambanum

Jinnabiddy, from Tharrkari country, was born about 1855 and continued to live on country after it was colonised by the British when Mangaroon Pastoral Station was established

Johnny Ong, also know as Mary, was employed as a domestic labourer in the home of William & Catherine Cusack in Midland Junction. The Cusack’s had connections with Tambrey station, 190 kms south of Roebourne, in Ngarluma country, and Mundabullangana station, 100 kms south of Port Hedland, in Kariyarra. It is possible, therefore, that Johnny came from Ngarluma or Kariyarra country.
Item 1909/0028

Joongabur, possibly from Bardi Jawi or Nyul-Nyul country; aged around 65 and residing at Weedong Station, Pender Bay, in 1909, Joongabur was blind; possibly previously living at Cygnet Bay Mission

Josephine Marshall, born about 1890, was raised by Father Nicholas D’Emo, first in Broome and then at the Drysdale River Mission. Josephine was sent for schooling to the convent at Roebourne, before returning to Drysdale River Mission when she was 19. There were three Filipino men from whom she was to choose a husband but the permission to marry was denied by the Chief Protector Charles Gale, as he was opposed to any marriage between Aboriginal women and Asian men. However, Josephine subsequently married Albert Fernandez in 1918, who was born in Calcutta and worked as a gardener at the Boolathana Station, and raised a very large family in Carnarvon.

Juigabur, also known as Mary, possibly from Bardi Jawi or Nyul-Nyul country; she was aged around 60 and residing at Weedong Station, Pender Bay, in 1909; possibly previously living at Cygnet Bay Mission
Item 1909/0025

Lena, born about 1904, possibly from Birriliburu country, camped around Lake Nebbaru, Wiluna, in 1909.
Item 1909/0020

Lilly, born about 1893, was reared up by Turkey (see entry on Turkey) on Frog Hollow Station. She owned her own cattle and horses but was sent away to Beagle Bay Mission against her and her mother’s wishes. While waiting to be transported to Beagle Bay, Lilly was indentured to the household of Police Constable Buckland in Wyndham. Lilly had problems with her eyes and the prognosis for her sight was not good.
Item 1909/0042
Item 1910/0318

Lizzie Brockman, see Yandirrthyango

Magging, alias Paddy, husband of Trilby; possibly from Wongatha or Maduwongga country, between Laverton and Boulder; 1909

Marcilla Marsellino, born about 1892 in Broome or Beagle Bay Mission, her father was Jose Marsellino, a Filipino who married an Aboriginal (unnamed) woman. Permission was applied for Marcilla to marry a Filipino (“Manilaman”) named Margharito Maghanoy, but permission was refused because the Chief Protector, Charles Gale, was opposed to marriages between Aboriginal people and Asians.

Mary, see Juigabur

Mary, see Johnny Ong

Migebung, also known as Rosie; possibly from Wirtakarri Nyamal country, around Mable Bar; worked in the home of Thomas Byass and travelled with the family to Perth; 1909

Molge, also known by his English name Sambo, possibly from Bardi Jawi or Nyul-Nyul country; he was aged around 50 and residing at Weedong Station, Pender Bay, in 1909; possibly previously living at Cygnet Bay Mission, Molge had a wooden leg.

Murra Bullboo, from Tharrkari country, was born about 1855 and continued to live on country after it was colonised by the British when Mangaroon Pastoral Station was established

Nellie, also known as Janie, was the wife and widow of Bobbie Teetum; after his death in 1909, his property was sold and Eliza purchased sewing materials, suggesting she was a competent needlewoman.

Newell, Thomas, possibly from Wadjuk Noongar country; sent his daughter Phoebe to school at the Swan Native and Half-caste Mission in 1909

Newry Jack, also known as Paddy, was said to be from the Port Darwin area. He was born about 1870 and came to Western Australia from the Northern Territory when he was child. At that time he was accompanying Thomas McKell who came to Wyndham to sell cattle, but remained in the Kimberley to work for the pastoral company Connor, Doherty & Durack. His name of “Newry Jack” comes probably from the pastoral station Newry on the NT & WA border, owned by Patsy Durack. He appears to have been influential in leading other workers to get better work conditions, which resulted in his being deported back to NT in 1909.

Paddy, see Magging

Peter; possibly from Njaki-Njaki Noongar country, Peter was working for Alan Crossman on his property Comminin, near Doodlekine. Peter cleared land for Crossman in exchange for a horse, previously owned by Bobbie Teetum, valued at £3. Unfortunately, once the clearing was finished and Peter went to claim his horse from a paddock on Comminin, it was found dead; 1909

Rosie, English name for Migebung (see Migebung entry)

Sambo, see Molge

Tommy, son of Trilby, possibly from Wongatha or Maduwongga country, between Laverton and Boulder; sent to Swan Native & Half-Caste Mission aged around 9 years; 1909

Toorgabur, also known by her English name Jenny, possibly from Bardi Jawi or Nyul-Nyul country; she was aged around 60 and residing at Weedong Station, Pender Bay, in 1909; possibly previously living at Cygnet Bay Mission

Trilby, mother of two daughters and Tommy, who were taken away from her while serving 6 months hard labour in Fremantle for a crime it seems clear she did not commit; possibly from Wongatha or Maduwongga country, between Laverton and Boulder; 1909

Turkey, possibly from Yanyuwa country in Northern Territory, owned her own cattle and horses and worked on Frog Hollow with Sam Muggleton. Turkey had three known children and reared up Lilly (see entry for Lilly). Once in Muggleton’s absence, Turkey was attacked and then later killed, apparently by a local Aboriginal mob.
Item 1909/0042
Item 1910/0318

Wandaroo, possibly from Birriliburu country; camped near Lake Nabberu in 1909, he was born about 1855 and was blind by 1909

Watson, Gypsy, from Bardi country, born c1887; Harry Hunter (see European Biographies) applied for Gypsy to be exempt from the Aborigines Act of 1905 (outcome unknown)

Willie, see Agot

Willie, born at Chinganarra Station, of possibly Tharrkari mother, who died when Willie was about 3 years old and living at that time in Onslow; Willie was taken to Perth as a young boy by Harry Timms, Justice of the Peace, part-owner of Mardie Station, in 1909

Winnie, see Cooberong entry

Wyndham, living in Claremont at the time of his death in 1909; he was admitted to Perth Hospital on Jan 9th with tuberculosis, but died two days later. Although his name suggests perhaps he was from the North-West, the report says that his family and friends in Claremont were notified of his passing.

Yambanum, also called Jimmy, possibly from Umiida, Unggarrangu, Unggumi, or Warrwa country (it is not clear because Oobagooma Station, the camp where Yambanum was found, is on the border of these countries, and also it might have been a gathering of different communities at that camp, at that time); Yambanum was taken to Derby Hospital, very ill. He discharged himself from the hospital and it is unclear if Yambanum was sent to Dorre Island lock hospital.

Yandirrthyango, possibly from Kariyarra country, known as Lizzie Brockman, was indentured to Matilda Hester in 1903, at the age of about 6 years, at Abydos Station. Lizzie was subsequently taken first to Bullsbrook, where she attended the local state school and later to the Harvey region.
Item 1907/0188

Yarrabiddy, possibly from Wadjarri Yamatji country, mentioned as needing clothing at Mt Phillip station in 1909

Yarran, possibly from Birriliburu country; camped near Lake Nabberu in 1909, he was born about 1850 and was very ill by 1909

Yeldebba, from Tharrkari country, was born about 1855 and continued to live on country after it was colonised by the British when Mangaroon Pastoral Station was established

Yintheebung, possibly from Kariyarra country, known as Minnie, was indentured to Matilda Hester in 1903, at the age of about 10 years, at Abydos Station. Minnie was subsequently taken first to Bullsbrook, where she attended the local state school and later to the Harvey region.
Item 1907/0188

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